Creative Ways to Make Your Wedding Unique

milkglass-2When you start planning your wedding, one of the questions that you’ll ask yourself will be, “How do I make my wedding unique?” One way is to use milk glass for your table settings. It’s something from your Grandmother’s era that will add a sense of timelessness to your wedding. Milk glass comes in hundreds of shapes and sizes, so using them in groupings (instead of just one) adds a lot of interest. Here are a few tips for milk glass usage:

  • Try to use vases of varying heights.
  • Use different shapes.
  • Consider using candlelight if you’ve decided on an evening event.
  • Have fun hunting for the different pieces – look in Grandmother’s attic, antique malls, and yard sales.
  • Think about using a colored tablecloth so the vases really stand out.
A Little Bit of History

Milk Glass was first made in Venice in the 16th century. It came in many different colors: blue, pink, yellow, brown, black, and white. Then during the 19th century, glass makers made milky white opaque glass called “opal glass.” The name milk glass is relatively new. The white color is achieved through the addition of an opacifier.

Milk glass was made into many decorative forms, such as lamps, jewelry, and vases. Originally, the pieces were made for the wealthy and were known for their delicacy and beauty in color and design. Later pieces from the 1930’s and 1940’s are less so.

What to Look For

For your wedding, you don’t have to find the 16th century pieces. You just need to look for the pieces you find attractive. The prices can range from $2 per vase to $60 per vase. Remember that you can always bargain a little, that’s the fun part! The colored milk glass is more rare, so it will most likely be more expensive.

Have fun and maybe we’ll run into each other at the next yard sale!


Like this post? Share the love!

Pin on PinterestShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponShare on TumblrDigg thisShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page